Old colors and techniques in a new collection – The New Indian Express

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Express press service

CHENNAI: pomegranate seeds impart a ruby ​​red hue, mulberry leaves paint the natural green, light buttery yellow undertones of myrobalan and marigold, rich red and amber tones obtained from Indian madder, deep crimson hues arraku (lac) and indigo, meticulously processed and curated to create blue hues – these are some of the natural dyes on display in front of Taj Connemara silk saris. The hours of excruciating natural dye extraction process, strenuous weaving and extra handwork were neatly hidden in the elegance of silk. The event witnessing the latest innovations in the RmKV world on Wednesday was a show of colors and an in-depth analysis of the saree-making process.

Launch of the latest

RmKV is known for introducing revolutionary innovations in handwoven Kanchipuram silk sarees. This time, she has created two new inventions again for the holiday season by returning to tried and tested traditional methods. While the Naturals collection draws on a revered tradition of dyeing to create designs that are both luxurious and durable, Lino Silk uses Leno Technology, a silk weaving method trademarked by RmKV, which has been used to make 40% handwoven Kanchipuram silk sarees. lighter. Giving more information on natural dyeing, Shankar Kumaraswamy, Director of RmKV Silks, said: “All fabrics were naturally dyed until the introduction of synthetic dyes in 1856.

Practical and economical, synthetic dyes quickly replaced natural ingredients as coloring agents; the environmental impact of their toxic effluents is now all too apparent. Ancient recipes used to create natural dyes and mordants have either been lost or retained by a dwindling number of dyers in small groups of artisans. More naturally, dyed sarees, such as block printed cotton sarees, are only colored after being woven. However, the silk of Kanchipuram sarees must be dyed before it can be woven on the loom. The company is currently reviving old colors that are often unused.

By blending the latest technology and offering the old glory, RmKV aims to create a new world of authentic traditional sarees. Pranav Kumaraswamy, Director of RmKV Silks, explained the new techniques. “Lino silk sarees have been handcrafted in our center in Tamil Nadu. We have used two patented techniques in the Lino silk saree. The KV technique has been applied to the interlocking meenakari effect, and the Lino technique has been applied for transparency and comfort of drapability. The whole process involved twisting the yarn in a unique way followed by restructuring followed by restructuring of the looms,” he summarized .

CHENNAI: pomegranate seeds impart a ruby ​​red hue, mulberry leaves paint the natural green, light buttery yellow undertones of myrobalan and marigold, rich red and amber tones obtained from Indian madder, deep crimson hues arraku (lac) and indigo, meticulously processed and curated to create blue hues – these are some of the natural dyes on display in front of Taj Connemara silk saris. The hours of excruciating natural dye extraction process, strenuous weaving and extra handwork were neatly hidden in the elegance of silk. The event witnessing the latest innovations in the RmKV world on Wednesday was a show of colors and an in-depth analysis of the saree-making process. The launch of the latest RmKV is known for introducing revolutionary innovations in handwoven Kanchipuram silk sarees. This time, she has created two new inventions again for the holiday season by returning to tried and tested traditional methods. While the Naturals collection draws on a revered tradition of dyeing to create designs that are both luxurious and durable, Lino Silk uses leno technology, a silk weaving method trademarked by RmKV, which has been used to make handwoven Kanchipuram silk sarees 40 percent lighter. Giving more information on natural dyeing, Shankar Kumaraswamy, Director of RmKV Silks, said: “All fabrics were naturally dyed until the introduction of synthetic dyes in 1856. Convenient and economical, synthetic dyes quickly replaced natural ingredients as coloring agents; the environmental impact of their toxic effluents is now all too apparent. Ancient recipes used to create natural dyes and mordants have either been lost or retained by a dwindling number of dyers in small groups of artisans. More naturally, dyed sarees, such as block printed cotton sarees, are only colored after being woven. However, the silk of Kanchipuram sarees must be dyed before it can be woven on the loom. The company is currently reviving old colors that are often unused. By blending the latest technology and offering the old glory, RmKV aims to create a new world of authentic traditional sarees. Pranav Kumaraswamy, Director of RmKV Silks, explained the new techniques. “Lino silk sarees have been handcrafted in our center in Tamil Nadu. We have used two patented techniques in the Lino silk saree. The KV technique has been applied to the interlocking meenakari effect, and the Lino technique has been applied for transparency and comfort of drapability. The whole process involved twisting the yarn in a unique way followed by restructuring followed by restructuring of the looms,” he summarized .

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